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. this view of america's islamist enemy is unfortunate endemic in both u.s. political parties, much of the u.s. and western media, and perhaps most damaging, much of the academy, especially and most prestigious universities. it is in my judgment that this is almost entirely without substantiation. and it continues to be washington's working assumption, america will slowly but surely be defeated with a loss of prestige, plot, financial solvency, and domestic political cohesion. we will lose not because any of these threats are stronger than we are. that certainly is not the case. america's myopic indeed can america's myopic coming elite and its media acolytes have taken enemies who are each in military capability, at most the puny five-foot tall, even sandals, and made them into 10-foot tall and still growing behemoths. the three threats i'm going to speak about are those posed by iran, saudi arabia and al qaeda and its allies. taking these three threats, each of which is based in the persian gulf, let us first look at the smallest least threatening threat, that which comes from iran. since our
now. tell us why the company has to come out with that. in the u.s. you have crossovers, why are you bringing this one to europe? >> for family customers in europe, this is an important segment, more than a million units. if you have a small family in europe, a five door hatch back may not be enough room. this gives customers more storage room. the c max is something new for the european industry and has started a multivehicle activity segment. the first player was the renault scenic. now they are coming out with a three row variant. this is a two row passenger vehicle. there are those larger, some with sliding doors, so we are introducing the grand c max here in europe. >> the grand c max has three rows to it. >> you mentioned sliding doors. why sliding doors? some people think sliding doors are too much like a minivan. >> we hear from customers in the u.s. and europe, especially in europe where you are in crowded parking lots a lot. a traditional vehicle is harder to get in and out. it's easier to get in and out for the passenger. i think our team worked hard to make sure that the
military action. how far will the u.s. and its allies go to enforce a u.n.-authorized no-fly zone? also this hour, a new level of crisis at japan's crippled snuk power plant. as the race goes on to heat down those reactors, officials now say this disaster is on par with the worst nuclear accident in u.s. history and mile after mile of destruction, search and rescue crews barely know where to begin. we're with emergency teams risking their own lives to save others. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> president obama says the world has given moammar gadhafi ample warning that his bloody assault on rebel forces will not stand. mr. obama putting gadhafi on notice just a while ago, a day after the u.n. security council approved the use of force to protect civilians in libya. the president says the libyan leader would commit atrocities if left unchecked and thousands of people could die. >> these terms are not subject to negotiation. if gadhafi does not comply with the resolution, the international community will impose consequences. and the resolution will be enforce enforc
intervention in libya diplomatic preure is growing. the u.s., britain and france warned gaddafi to hold the advance and pull back on other cities. this comes on the heels of a decision to propose a no-fly zone. gaddafi has declared a cease- fire but rebels say government forces continued their assault. >> for these rebels the no-fly zone cannot come soon enough. the resolution gives me new hope. >> there for libya has decided on an immediate cease-fire and stoppage of all operations. >> that announcement has been received with skepticism. >> the libyan people have called for international assistance. this resolution paves the way for that to be answered. colonel gaddafi's refusal to hear the repeated calls to stop violence against his own people has left us with no other choice. >> the international community will not be tricked by the libyan regime. the international community will verify strict compliance with the resolution. >> at the nato headquarters preparations were made to pave the way for operations to begin this weekend. >> we now havthe power and legal basis to stop. that is
international airport. the shooting involved a u.s. military shuttle bus. someone got on the bus and started shooting. two are confirmed dead. we believe they're two u.s. soldiers. one person has been taken into custody. again we know two are killed. it is reported that those are two u.s. soldiers. the incident is over, the airport is operating as usual. this is out of frankfurt. as soon as we get more detail, we get to fred out of berlin. >>> the u.s. supreme court is reaffirming the first amendment right to free speech even if it is painful and ugly. in an 8-1 decision, they say a kansas church can push their message outside military funle rals. jeffrey toobin is on the phone with us. jeff, let's start off here, is this a surprise to you the court's decision? because this is a case that everybody's been watching. >> reporter: it's a pain until awful case and the westboro baptist church is an insuggelt religion everywhere. but the decision is not a surprise. these statements in this context, nondisruptive statements about politics, are at the heart of what the first amendment is all about e
to building more nuclear power plants in the u.s. that is up from last year. >>> and now, it is just about that time to head it to the man, the birthday man today, wolf blitzer in "the situation room." wolf, to you. >>> thanks very much, brooke. happening now, two u.s. air force crew members make it out of a fighter jet crash in libya alive. we are taking you to the crash site and telling you how libyan rebels help keep one of them safe. >>> also, president obama is facing growing anger for ordering air strikes in libya without the approval of congress. now, one fellow democrat, even talking about possible impeachment. >>> and new u.s. assessments of the radiation risks from japan's nuclear crisis and new progress inside the plant to shed light on the damage from the sudan. i'm wolf blitzer. you are in "the situation room." >>> some very anxious hours for the u.s. military after the crash of a fighter jet, giving way to relief now that the two crew members are safely out of libya. defense officials confirming that both the pilot and the weapons officer have been rescued. they say the f-15
>> tonight, battle for libya. u.s.-led attacks and enforcing a no-fly zone intensifies for a second day. but the pentagon says, muammar qaddafi is not a target. i'm russ mitchell. also tonight, on the ground, a defiant qaddafi shoots back bowing a long war as rebels take rounds in benghazi. >> anxiety rises in quake ravaged japan as food and water show signs of nuclear contamination. >>> and staying connected, technology provide's lifeline for students trying to find loved ones in japan's disaster zone. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with russ mitchell. >> good evening. a second wave of u.s.-led air attacks against libya is under way tonight as b2 bombers from the first wave return to their base in missouri late tonight. on the ground, u.s. aircraft attack libyan forces south of benghazi for the first time while muammar qaddafi remained defiant, calling nations allied against him the party of satan and vowing to fight inch by inch for his country. we have correspondents on the ground in libya and in washington with the latest and we begin with national se
, if you are just waking up. fresh word from the nation's top military officer after u.s. and coalition forces bombarded libya's defenses overnight. admiral mike mullen tells nbc news there is a no-fly zone in place in libya. that's after more than 110 tomahawk cruise missiles from warships and submarines slammed the antiaircraft units and command posts. admiral mullen also said that possible outcome of the military action could include the embattled leader, moammar gadhafi, remaining in power. meanwhile, gadhafi issued an audio address on state tv, saying the country was preparing for a long war. on the screen, the image of a giant, gold fist crushing an american plane. nbc's jim maceda's in libya's capital of tripoli. jim, with another good day to you, we have cruise missiles that were targeting sites around the city there. what's it like there now? >> reporter: here, it's quiet. it wasn't so at 2:30, 3:00 in the morning, though, alex. we all jumped and jolted first when we heard a number of explosions. it was these deep thuds that you never like to hear. they could have been cruise m
in the euro after it jumped to a four-month high against the u.s. dollar on thursday. now coming away from that a little bit, but obviously underlying that, underpinning the euro was the central bank president. slightly caught investors offguard when he said interest rates may rise as soon as next month. people had been betting in terms of june or may. the yen at 82.44 to the dollar. >>> investors across asia seem to be focusing pretty much what's going on in the u.s. we've got that better than expected jobs number out. it was a weekly jobs number which is providing a pretty strong indicator, at least that's how it's being seen for the u.s. economy. that rally overnight. and that helped the markets pretty much across the board here in asia. all four of the key markets up by more than 1.4%. there was a weaker yen against the u.s. dollar in japan, that helped the exporters. all in all, hong kong up 1.25%, shanghai 1.3%, and australia with a 1.2% gain. >>> well, if you thought that was impressive, let's have a look at the u.s. markets. and essentially what we're looking at is the best session
the u.s. military is getting ready to take an extraordinary step evacuating troops from the island. >>> and i'm kiran chetry. no relief in sight for homeowners. new numbers showing how weak the housing market is. and even more troubling, analysts said we may not have hit bottom yet. "american morning" starts right now. >>> all right. it is tuesday, march 22nd. a lot of news this morning. again, it's been a wild couple of weeks. >> and it's well into the day in japan. already another two earthquakes today. we're well into the 600s in terms of aftershocks and tremors. more concerns there. >> we're going to bring everybody up to date on that. but first, we're going to start with libya. coalition forces hammering moammar gadhafi's forces and positions as the head of forces in libya said the coalition flew 80 missions yesterday more than half of them by countries other than the united states. also saying that the dictator's momentum has been stopped, at least for now. but in misrata, which is a key city two hours east of tripoli, people are saying that civilians are still being massacre
. police are searching for possible accomplices. >>> in business news the federal reserve says the u.s. economy continues toex pand gradually while some manufacturers and retailers are starting to pass on higher crude oil prices to customers. >>> on wednesday the fed released the so-called beige book report. that's a survey of economic conditions in the 12 districts across the country. the document says overall economic activity continued to expand at a modest to moderate pace in january and early february. it says most districts reported continued rises in corporate production and con sumtder spending. meanwhile, the report notes that manufacturers and retailers have passed on higher costs of crude oil and raw materials to clients and or are planning to do so in the near future. this trend will likely continue if commodity prices keep rising. >>> now, apple chief executive steve jobs returned from medical leave for a day to unveil a new lighter ipad tablet computer equipped with two cameras. >> thanks for coming. thank you. it's really thin. and it comes in two colors. >> jobs made hi
of circumstances and an entirely different mission which is not the u.s. military mission at this point. but clearly it is a political mission for the white house and many of the united states military diplomatic allies there in europe. >> jim, thanks. >> you bet. >> i want to talk more about that coalition. the military muscles has put moammar gadhafi air defenses. these attacks reach the door step, striking the administration building but the location is currently unknown. jim maceda has the latest from tripoli for us. have there been air strikes? >> no, there haven't been, thomas. we have some news, however, of this ongoing development in the third largest city. it is gadhafi forces which were hit by the air strikes, by the way, outside yesterday. today they are on the attack with reports that gadhafi troops now with tanks and snipers have entered the city and fired on people killing the latest figure is at least nine individuals. now this is extremely interesting because you've got troops who allegedly have changed out of their uniforms into street clothes looking like either armed
to rain down. aircraft like this u.s. marine corps harrier jet have flown more than 212 missions so far against the libyan forces. ships in the mediterranean has launched more than 160 tomahawk cruise missiles. in the daylight the damage is becoming clear. this is what is left of several large rocket launchers, trucks and also other military hardware in tripoli's port area. far to the east, a u.s. fighter plane crashed due to mechanical problems. that happened near the opposition strong hold of bengahzi. the two-man crew parachuted from the doomed aircraft. u.s. marines managed to extract crewmen, one was picked up by rebels and taken to a luxury hotel suite. he's back in american hands. two days after the coalition missile slammed into his tripoli compound, a defined moammar gadhafi has been addressing supporters. he urged muslims worldwide to join the battle against what he calls blatant aggression. >> translator: we will be victorious in this fight. we will not give up. they will not penalize us. we are making fun of their rockets. the libyans are laughing at these rockets. we will d
>>> this sunday, the allied strike against libya stretches into its second week as the u.s. seeks to limit its role. >> responsibility for this operation is being transferred from the united states to our nato allies and partners. >> but as criticism from congress mounts, many questions remain. what happens if gadhafi clings to power? what are the limits of the u.s.'s role if a civil war gets worse? and how does a military campaign relate to our overall strategy in the mideast? this morning, a special joint interview, with us, the secretary of state hillary clinton and secretary of defense robert gates. >>> then -- the president faces critics from both sides of the aisle. did he overstep his constitutional authority by using force without consulting congress. my interview this morning with republican from indiana senator richard lugar. >>> finally, analysis of the administration's handling of the crisis in libya is our fragile economic recovery continues and our military is stretched thin by two other wars, did the president make the case to the american people that libya is worth
will take charge? what role will the u.s. play and did the hundredth vote come too late to stop gadhafi? will gadhafi fight for the death or accept some kind of a deal? we'll try to answer those questions as we prepare to fingt third muslim count -- fight in m country. >>> japanese more or less admit they are overwhelmed. wow. they are ememploying it throw against the wall and see what sticks approach ahead of the u.s. nuclear commission says it could takes wakes to get this under control. score one for the unions in wisconsin. a judge has temporarily blocked that new law shrinking collective bargaining rights. democrats hope that's the first of many obstacles. republicans say it's a speed bump. libya. we know how we're getting in. how will we get out? we start with the growing cry slinsia. richard engel is joining us from cairo. thank you, richard. give us a sense of what's happening as the u.n. begins to take action. what is the condition of the rebel force, especially benghazi. >> reporter: the rebel force is very weak in benghazi and across the country. what happened was the rebels
around the globe warn about the risks and u.s. stocks get whipsawed. >> tom: as the situation unfolds, how is the nuclear industry responding to the escalating crisis? and what is in store for investors? you're watching "nightly business report" for wednesday, march 16. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone. fears escalated today around the world about the nuclear crisis in japan. comments from energy officials in europe and the u.s. raised questions about danger from the damaged reactors, tom. >> tom: susie, these were stark comments from top global experts. europe's energy chief said japan's dai-ichi nuclear plant was "effectively out of control." the u.s. energy secretary said there was a "partial meltdown" there. additionally, americans within 50 miles of the area were urged to evacuate. >> susie: and tom, those warnings spooked u.s. stock investors, sendin
plants right here in the united states. >>> and will the u.s. supreme court green light a massive discrimination lawsuit against walmart? arguments today in one of the most important workers' rights cases the court has ever heard. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> moammar gadhafi and his troops are being accused of new carnage and destruction. just hours after president obama tried to explain the u.s. mission in libya to the american people. this hour we have breaking news. we're learning about major, major setbacks for rebel forces in several cities. in misrata, witnesses say government forces are hammering the city hard, firing bullets over civilians' heads and telling them to run for their lives. gadhafi is fighting back with a vengeance against rebels who had regained ground in recent days under the cover of coalition air strikes. >>> and joining us now in ajdabiya is our own arwa damon. you're with the rebels there. how are they doing, arwa? what's the latest? >> reporter: well, wolf, it's been another bitterly disappointing day for the opposition here. th
by gadhafi's forces. in an interview this morning, u.s. joint chiefs chairman mike mull ensays the coalition attacks have effectively stopped that assault. and our candy crowley is talking to him on "state of the union" in an hour here on cnn. you'll be able to catch that. also a short time ago, we heard from libyan leader himself, gadhafi, who had plenty to say about the coalition strikes. >> translator: if the men were to be killed, the women will take over. we will hold the green flag high. they must know today that it is a confrontation between the libyan people and america, france, and britain. and the christian pact. all the libyans women and women are ready today to be leaders. but we will be victorious. you will be defeated. >> he also said the aggressors would never lay a hand on his land or soul. this was an audio message. it is tough to independently confirm even if we do believe it's him. we didn't see him this time. >> no, we didn't. we'll be looking at that in the hours ahead. colonel gadhafi, that gee fins we heard in the face of overnight coalition strikes and activity which
there was no risk to any u.s. territory from the reactors. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the containment operations, the ongoing exodus of people from areas close to the reactors, and new footage from when the tsunami struck six days ago. >> woodruff: and amid signs of both resilience and confusion, we look at japan's political culture in response to the disaster. >> brown: then, ray suarez has an update on libya, as the u.n. moves to a vote on establishing a no-fly zone over the country. >> woodruff: margaret warner talks to irish prime minister enda kenny about the celtic tiger's struggle to kick-start it's economy. >> brown: and tom bearden reports on a project to use private satellites to help stop genocide. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> you can't manufacture pride, but pride builds great cars. and you'll find it in the people at toyota, all across america. >> auto companies make huge profits. >> last year, chevron made a l
as a u.s. operation. so there really was a need from their point of view to build up enough international political support so that the united states could say -- stay if not in the background, at least sort of on the sidelines. >> and the president in his press conference, i thought it was striking to list the things that we're not going to do. we're not going to deploy ground troops. we're not going to use force to go beyond a well-defined goal. what's with all this not, not, not stuff? >> there's a lot of ambiguity. he did say we're not going to employ a ground force which is prohibited by the u.n. resolution as well. he also said the goal of the operation will not go beyond protecting civilians. but at the same time, he said qaddafi has lost the legitimacy to lead. and you had secretary clinton and you had the french government also saying that the logical result of this operation will be that the qaddafi regime is overthrown. so they've certainly injected -- gwen: a logical result, but is that the goal? they've now set out a goal they have to push him out of office. they can't stop s
new american security. we will talk with the u.s. import export bank on president obama's trip to latin america and what it means for u.s. trade. after that, we will discuss the implementation of the health care law. ♪ host: as president obama cut his latin america trip short, and returns to washington, the washington post reports that key nato allies have tentatively agreed to take the lead role. but none have officially signed on. other news out of the middle east -- the yemen president pledging to step down when your early has not satisfied opponents. help from saudi arabia is likely to be rejected. we will keep you updated throughout today's "washington journal." the nation's health-care law turned 1 years old today. we have a separate line set aside for health care .ractitioner i the new health care law -- it says, a loose federation of left-leaning groups have gathered to peddle the virtues of health care reform. it is like we have to world. the article says that in other words, the future is very uncertain right now. i would not give more than a 50- 50 chance that all
in the u.s., the financial markets ignored those debt concerns. but erika miller looks at why american investors may want to pay attention to the crisis in portugal. >> reporter: for the past few weeks, investors have had plenty of distractions, ranging from political upheaval in egypt and libya to natural disasters and nuclear problems in japan to sharply higher oil prices. but today, the spotlight was on a problem many thought had gone away-- the european debt crisis. the fall of the portuguese government has pushed that country's borrowing rates to record levels, making it more difficult for portugal to get a handle on it's debt. economist brian levitt says the fear in financial markets is that portugal could need an expensive bailout. >> the big fear about the fall of the government in portugal is that they are not going to go through the austerity measures that they need, that the larger euro-economies want for them to go through in order to get additional credit facilities. >> reporter: another fear is contagion, reinforced by credit rating agency moody's downgrade of more than 3
of the stricken reactor is at the fukushima plant. radiation continues to spread from the site. u.s. engineers and others are explaining their options of containing the leak. >> in the small village 40 kilometers northeast of fukushima, while outside detroit exclusion zone, the people living here thought they were safe -- northeast of fukushima, well east -- outside of the exclusion zone. >> this has exceeded the data. >> the latest news from fukushima also offers no grounds for optimism. yvette tb's do not know when or even if they will be able to return home -- in evacuees -- the evacuees do not know. >> we do not know when the situation will normalize, and we do not think there will be a future for us in the city. >> operator tepco has decided to decommission four of the reactors. filling them up may be necessary. >> government and experts are considering but these four buildings at the fukushima-dai- ichi plant to stop the spread of the substances. >> a they will spray it with a synthetic resin to try to prevent radioactive dust from being blown away or being watched to see. in a refugee c
, the u.s. military confirms an f-15 fighter jet has crashed in libya, but the pentagon says it was not shot down. we'll have the latest on the fate of the crew. >> plus. >> let me emphasize that this operation will take place in a matter of days, not a matter of weeks. >> it's still unclear who will take charge. in japan, set back and progress, as the crippled reactor's spent fuel rods -- officials say they can't turn on the juice just yet. it's tuesday march 22, i'm willie geist. also this morning with the first republican debate, a little over a month away, if you can believe it, finally at least one major gop candidate looks ready to run. let's get to the rundown. >>> we begin in libya where a united states f-15 fighter jet crashed today while carrying out its mission in benghazi. >> u.s. military officials tell nbc news that two crewmembers have indeed been rescued from the ground there in libya and are safely on their way to europe. the two crewmember in their f-15 eagle were on a routine mission enforcing that no fly zone east of benghazi when the fighter jet experienc
of action, now comes the patrolling of a no-fly zone over libya. that's the word from africa. u.s. military's africa command describes phase two of an allied campaign to protect libyan civilians from their own government. the action phase include add cruise missile strike on the heart of moammar gadhafi's compound in tripoli. libyan officials say no one was hurt, and the allies say gadhafi is not being targeted. the bombed out building supposedly house add military command and control center. after well over 100 missile launches on saturday, an efricon spokesman says operation odyssey dawn as it's called may have peaked. nine other members and nato may take the lead, though that is still being decide. and libyan fighters are still on the move. word from misrata east of tripoli, gadhafi's tanks unleashed absolute destruction and carnage. a witness says they are shooting people in the main street. an exclusive cnn poll finds broad american support for the allied mission. more than 80% say protecting libyans from their longtime dictator should be a somewhat or very important goal of the u.s. b
? what role will the u.s. play? and did the u.n. vote come too late to stop gadhafi? will gadhafi fight for the death or accept some kind of deal. answer those questions as we prepare to fight in a third muslim country. and japanese authorities have raised the assessment of a nuclear disaster to a five -- that's three mile island level on a seven-point scale and they now more or less at mitt they're overwhelmed. they're employing a throw against the wall and see what sticks approach in the nuclear commission. it says it can take weeks to get this thing under control. score one for the unions in wisconsin. the judge has temporarily blocked the new law shrinking collective bargaining rights in that state. wow, democrats hope this is the first of many obstacles. republicans say, it's just a speed bump, check it out. let me finish with libya. we know how we're getting in. but do you have any idea how we're going to get out? we start on libya. richard engle is joining us from cairo. thank you, richard, give us a sense of what's happening as the u.n. begins to take action. what is the conditi
to do with china and are essential to get right to make sure the u.s. and european countries are on track. >> host: it's almost as if there's a couple of different books in one book. there is your story of the decline of the west, your story of the rise of the east and the lines are going to cross. >> guest: i think this is you can argue there's an absolute part for short talking about the west and its isolation and issues going out there and going in an amazing time and other european economies have done the unthinkable moving hundreds of millions of people out of poverty so this is going to naturally be able to question as well. >> host: let's talk about what is going wrong in the west. >> guest: first of all its important that in terms of the context of my work i talk about the unintended consequences, things that sound like a good intentions but actually yield bad outcomes and what i have done is to focus on the three key ingredients economists focus on as the drivers of economic growth and there is a capital that is basically money, labor that is the work force and then
, however, as you noted, because even amid this crisis, the u.s. has had some contact with libyan officials and that has been critical in terms of helping to get americans and others out of the tripoli safely. so if you were to cut off all of those ties, that could put some of the remaining americans, obviously, in some jeopardy. why would the u.s. then take such a dramatic step and cut off all diplomatic ties? because that was a big deal for colonel gadhafi a few years ago when the george w. bush administration finally said he was no longer a rogue state, that they would recognize him diplomatally because he came forward with his weapons program. if all of a sudden the u.s. cut off all ties, that would he remove even more if there is a shred of legitimacy left for gadhafi and remove it once and for all. that would be the pressure point because that is something he has craved so long is have some legitimacy on the world stage. of course, given what ben is reporting and given what is happening on the ground right now, it's doubtful he has any legitimacy but the u.s. is looking for any lever
. we have lots of things in common with the u.s., fast, generous territory, homogeneous people, hardworking people. we don't have racial problems that affect some african countries or the wars that are waged in europe nor the religious conflict of europe itself. and therefore latin america is called to compromise or rather commitment with its own fate. and therefore we are looking forward to president obama's words. we are all left-handed. we have many coincidences. we studied in harvard, both of us. we are sportsmen. president obama continues to be a basketball player. i was in my time as well. i think the first lady of the u.s. is very good-looking, and president obama has said the same thing about the first lady of chile. there are plenty of 0 coincidences. but the most important one is the one we'll find this afternoon, and modestly if i could suggest to president obama, we hope to have a partnership that is two -- one where we have all responsibilities and not existentialism because it's never been enough. rather a partnership of collaboration between latin america and the
evening. i'm bret baier. pentagon officials say so far the u.s. spent $580 million on the libyan conflict. while we're committed to the operation financially, militarily and diplomatically, questions remain about what it will mean to deem the mission a success. james rosen is at the state department. good evening. >> reporter: good evening. president obama and top commanderrers pushed forward on the parallel and separate path to strip muammar gaddafi of his ability to wage war and pressuring him to resign. today a top nato commander said the missions may connect over time in london, secretary of state hillary clinton met with colleagues from the united nations, europe and arab league to sketch out end game in libya. clinton said arming the libyan rebels were not discussed and only vaguely did she address growing speculation that gaddafi will receive asylum. >> we believe he must go. we're working with the international community to try to achieve that outcome. and look for political resolution which could include leaving the country. >> bret: we are not engaged and look for him to go does
a possible radioactive plume hitting southern california tomorrow. u.s. officials insist people in japan could stay 50 miles away from the fukushima daiichi plant, much farther away than what the japanese government is telling its own people. helicopters once again scrambling to dump seawater onto this complex, and at the same time workers are racing to finish building a new power line that could restart the cooling system and thus give the relief to the overheating nuclear rods that everybody has been watching. officially the death toll now stands at more than 5y 300, about you it's expected to climb past 10,000. part of that is because there are more than 9,000 people missing today. and at least 460,000 are in evacuation centers, many with no homes to return to right now. ann curry is live right now from akita, japan. every day as we look at these numbers, it looks like things are not getting better. what's your sense there? >> they're not getting better, you're absolutely right, richard, what's happening, especially with the people who are quake and tsunami victims, they are above in
are overwhelmed. supplies are limited. plus, the u.s. military is moving in the region. the defense second robert gates now directioning two navy warships into the mediterranean. >>> and a dramatic new development in the race for 2012. the first major republican contender is ready to take a critical step towards announcing a run for president. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." let's begin with the latest developments in the libyan crisis. reports of gunfire and assault in the city of zawiya. that's where forces loyal to the libyan leader moammar gadhafi attempted but allegedly failed to seize control from rebels. meanwhile, a strong show of force against gadhafi just out of the united nations. the general assembly adopting a resolution to oust libya from the u.n. human rights council. we're monitoring the story from every angle on the ground as only the global resources of cnn can. first, let's go to tripoli where gadhafi shows no signs of losing his grip on power in the capital. some residents there have refrained from protesting for fear of simply being killed. cnn's senior inte
launches air strikes in eastern libya as it battles to regain control. two u.s. soldiers are killed in a shooting at frankfurt airport. german interior minister thomas de maiziere takes the defense portfolio in a cabinet reshuffle. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> we begin in libya, where gaddafi has threatened to start a war if the u.s. or nato intervenes in the unrest. speaking at a political rally, gaddafi says thousands of libyans could be killed if foreign powers and to the country. member is in the suez canal are heading toward libya as the u.s. and u.n. high pressure on the regime. forces loyal to gaddafi launched air strikes on a rebel- controlled town in the east of the country. >> dozens of seriously injured rebel soldiers have been admitted to this hospital. pro-gaddafi forces have launched air strikes on the city. the libyan leader attempts to recapture lost territory in the east of the country. inhabitants are fleeing the battles. there were intense clashes further west, in the oil port held by the rebels. gaddafi is striking back fro
. the case of raymond davis has caused a serious rift between islamabad and washington. the u.s. said davis is a diplomat and later revealed he's a cia contractor. those are the headlines. "world business today" starts right now. >>> good morning, from cnn london, i'm charles hudson. >> and a very good afternoon from cnn hong kong, i'm andrew stevens. welcome to "world business today." our top story, this thursday, march 3rd. oil prices are pulling back but still over $100 a barrel. >>> apple's ceo steve jobs is back on stage. and the biggest surprise of the event. >>> and as the kadafi family with assets in spain, we'll investigate how they've been investing around the world. >>> we've been watching the protests in libya and the events there driving oil higher and stocks lower. rumors actually in the market, and those have been affecting it, affect, oil price and stocks. this is really looking totally beyond the instability there, but because we have seen pressure coming off oil prices we are seeing that in stock. and tuesday's close of $102, let's look at brent crude, it is the primary oi
world war ii. we have team fox coverage this hour and james has the latest from washington on the u.s. effort to help. but first we will get to the pacific coast of japan. what is the latest on the nuclear situation there to the north? >>reporter: well, it is happening again, up the coast from where we are, the massive complex of nuclear reactors has been targeted, hit by both of earthquake and tsunami. the technicians this night are trying to avoid yet another hydrogen explosion at this reactor, the nuclear rods have been exposed, partly exposed and the risk of a meltdown at this reactor we are told is very real there already have been other explosions at one reactor this morning and another at another reactor on saturday. each time there is an explosion there is release of radioactivity that is why there is a 12 mile exclusion zone, 140,000 people have been evacuated and some have been exposed to radiation and the folk here, the authorities say it is under control but there are a lot of skeptical people here in japan and elsewhere. >>shepard: in question, greg, we know there are mil
council resolution 1973. u.s. and british forces launched 12 tomahawk land attack missiles, targeting command-and-control facilities service to skirt -- a scud facility and a re-attack of the previous air site. forces from france, spain, italy, denmark, and united kingdom, with missions to sustain a no-fly zone in benghazi, to protect civilians from attack, and conduct further reconnaissance. coalition naval vessels sustained maritime controls toward u.n. security council resolution, to prevent the illegal shipments of arms to and from libya. iss our actions are generally achieving the intended objections. we have not observed a libyan military aircraft operating since the beginning of operations. the naval vessels have returned to or remain in port. cents initial strikes, no regime long range air defense radars. air attacks have succeeded in stopping regime ground forces from advancing to benghazi and we are now seeing ground forces moving southward from benghazi. we will, of course, watch these ground force movements closely. through a variety of reports, we know regime ground force
that have nothing to do with china and essential to get right to make sure the u.s. and european countries are back on track. >> host: it's like a couple different books in one book. there's the story of the decline of the west, the rise of the east, and the basic premise of the lines are going to cross. >> guest: you can argue there's an absolute part for sure talking about the west in isolation and what the issues are going on there, and then, of course, we live in an amazing time of china and other emerging economies have done the unthinkable, moving hundreds of thousands of people out of poverty. of course, that's answering the ire relative question as well which is what i've done in the book. >> host: let's start by talking about what's going wrong in the west. >> guest: sure. first of all, i think it's really important in terms of context of my work, entalk about unintended consequences, good intentions, but yields bad outcomes. what i've done in the book is focus on the three key ingredients. those are capital, basically money, labor, which is basically the work force, and then fina
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